facebook Triangle Pattern - Online Commodity trading

In the technical analysis, price is forming difference patterns. By definition, a price pattern is a recognizable configuration of price movement that is identified using a series of trendlines and/or curves. When a price pattern signals a change in trend direction, it is known as a reversal pattern; a continuation pattern occurs when the trend continues in its existing direction following a brief pause. Technical analysts have long used price patterns to examine current movements and forecast future market movements

Triangle Pattern

A triangle is created when there is a significant movement in the stock, followed by a period of consolidation – this creates the pennant shape due to the converging lines. A breakout movement then occurs in the same direction as the big stock move. These are similar to flag patterns and tend to last between one and three weeks. There will be significant volume at the initial stock movement, followed by weaker volume in the pennant section, and growth in volume at the breakout.

  • Ascending Triangle

This triangle usually appears during an upward trend and is regarded as a continuation pattern. It is a bullish pattern. Sometimes it can be created as part of a reversal at the end of a downward trend, but more commonly it is a continuation. Ascending triangles are always bullish patterns whenever they occur.

  • Descending Triangle

The descending triangle is another continuation pattern, but this triangle is a bearish pattern and is usually created as a continuation during a downward trend. Occasionally it can be seen as a reversal during an upward trend (the opposite of the ascending triangle pattern), but it is considered to be a continuation.

  • Bullish Symmetric Triangle

The symmetrical triangle pattern is easy to spot thanks to the distinctive shape which is developed by the two trendlines which converge. This pattern occurs by drawing trendlines, which connect a series of peaks and troughs. The trendlines create a barrier, and once the price breaks through these, a very sharp movement in price follows.

  • Bearish Symmetric Triangle

The symmetrical triangle pattern is easy to spot thanks to the distinctive shape which is developed by the two trendlines which converge. This pattern is created by drawing trendlines, which connect a series of peaks and troughs. The trendlines create a barrier, and once the price breaks through these, it is usually followed by a very sharp movement in price.